Vegan Wild Blueberry & Pumpkin Mug Cake: A Heavenly Match Made in Minutes

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When I first heard the idea of blueberries and pumpkin together, I hesitated. But within seconds my mind switched to “sure, why not?” As it turns out, these ingredients are simply amazing together, as long as you use Wild Blueberries. The intense sweet-tart flavor of Wild Blueberries compliments the pumpkin and autumn spices in a delightful way. None of the ingredients compete, but rather heighten one another for a warm satisfying holiday treat.

As many know, the holidays are a time when people on special diets can often feel left out. So I decided it might be fun to combine pumpkin and Wild Blueberries to create a single-serve mug cake that could be enjoyed anytime a little indulgence was needed; and it can be made in minutes.

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The base recipe is dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, soy-free and vegan, but I also tested it gluten-free for the Mr. Right in my life. Cake is perhaps his favorite dessert, and one he rarely gets to enjoy since he cut gluten from his diet many years ago. And he did indeed love this pumpkin mug cake!

Truth be told, I’m not a big cake person myself, but the tender, moist crumb and sweet, rich taste of this Wild Blueberry pumpkin mug cake won me over too. Here are some tips and options for when you make the recipe yourself:

  • Use frozen Wild Blueberries, not conventional. They have less water, so they perform better in baking. They’re also smaller and more flavorful so you get more “pops of deliciousness” in each bite.
  • Finally, since they really do grow wild in their native lands and are frozen within 24 hours of harvest, Wild Blueberries are substantially higher in antioxidants and fiber than the conventional ones. You can find Wild Blueberries in the freezer section of most major grocers.
  • You can further “healthify” this pumpkin mug cake, but be aware that it will affect the results. Using whole grain flours will result in a denser, but still delicious, dessert. Swapping in a different sweetener, like coconut sugar, will change the flavor and consistency a bit.
  • If you’re in the mood for a treat that’s a little less sweet, you can cut the sugar down to 2 or 2½ tablespoons.
  • But if you want a truly tender crumb, don’t skimp on the fat. I trialed versions with less oil, and they ended up more dense and too moist.+

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Vegan Wild Blueberry Pumpkin Mug Cake

1/4 cup all-purpose gluten-free flour or all-purpose flour (see note below)
3 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice or ground cinnamon
Scant 1/8 teaspoon salt (or a big pinch)
3 tablespoons pumpkin puree
2 tablespoons rice bran, grapeseed or your baking oil of choice
1½ tablespoons unsweetened dairy-free milk beverage
1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons frozen Wild Blueberries

Flour Note: You can use your favorite gluten-free flour blend in this recipe (store-bought or homemade), but do not simply swap in coconut flour or almond flour. I tested with Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour. I recommend using a pre-made flour blend since measuring such small quantities of flours and starches for a mug cake can be tedious!

  1. In a small bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, spice, vanilla and salt.
  2. Add the pumpkin, oil, milk beverage and vanilla and stir to combine.
  3. Very gently fold in the frozen Wild Blueberries. Keep them frozen to avoid “bleeding” of the brilliant blue.
  4. Pour into a greased, microwave-safe mug, and level out.
  5. Microwave the cake on HIGH for 1½ to 2 minutes, or until it appears cooked, and a toothpick inserted comes out clean. The time may vary based on your microwave; in my kitchen, it is perfect at 2 minutes.

Oven Option: Spoon the batter into a small ramekin. Bake at 350ºF for about 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.

About the Author

Alisa Fleming is the founder and Chief Editor of GoDairyFree.org, an online magazine and the leading dairy- free website. She also works as an Associate Editor for Allergic Living Magazine, an international print publication, and penned the best-selling book, Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook. Alisa is also a natural food product ambassador who works closely with brands that cater to dairy-free consumers. Alisa is based in the Reno, Nevada area.